Phörpa ~ The Cup (1999)

Country: Bhutan

A couple of youngsters wanting to watch the FIFA World Cup may not sound so unusual. After all, most people do that anyway, don’t they? But, what if these youngsters were Tibetan students living in a religious monastery in India?

Phorpa is far from typical Hollywood fare, relying on its unusual, yet delightful story to catch the attention of its viewers. Interesting questions are raised over the course of the film.

First is the Tibetan question itself. This amazing part of the world has seen so much strife over its history, and so many of its people are still scattered all over the world, not knowing whether they will ever get back to their homeland. In spite of this, Tibetans living abroad in countries like India still continue to follow their culture and their religious duties and this is apparent in Phorpa.

Another question is raised regarding the impact of popular culture and modernity over a very old religious way of life. The Lamas discuss whether it is right for the young ones to be pulled in by the material lure of the world cup. Is material pleasure the ultimate source of evil? Or does religion have to give place to modernity as well?

As the film progresses, the young novices try to find a way to watch the world cup. They are forced to rent a TV from an Indian dealer. However, things don’t go as smoothly as planned and a number of problems cause obstructions. However, these problems only test the solidarity of the young students.

There is no action in this film – no catfights or rat races. The film is realistic and visually beautiful. The music, like the film, is completely fresh and unique.

Bhutanese filmmaker/Lama Khyentse Norbu’s film is definitely worth watching for its wit and humour.

FINAL VERDICT: Watch it to see the lifestyle and beliefs of Tibetan monks as they try to accept modernity in an old way of life. Also watch it for a heartwarming story.

Avoid it if you are looking for something big to happen every two minutes. Also miss it if you are easily disappointed with subtle climaxes.

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