Osama (2003)

Country: Afghanistan

Looking at the title of the film, one immediately assumes that this film is about Osama Bin Laden – but that would be a completely wrong thought. However, even without a mention of Bin Laden, Osama manages to be just as emotionally scarring.

The film follows the story of a young girl (probably of 11 years of age), who has to become the breadwinner of her family after her father is killed. The only other members of her family are her mother and grandmother, both women.  In this strict Taliban regime, women are not allowed to work – which is what puts her mother out of work in the first place. To make sure that they do not go hungry, her mother chops off the young girl’s hair and disguises her as a boy so that she can work with the local milk vendor. Her true identity is only known to her family and to another male friend, who gives her the name ‘Osama’.

However, fate has its say in another manner, and the Taliban come to enlist all young boys. She is scooped up by them forcibly and is trained in military school. But this becomes a disturbing journey for her as she has to protect her real identity – because she knows that if she is discovered she will be killed.

How long can she hide this truth? And does she ever return to her family? Osama leaves you both shocked and disturbed as you undertake the harrowing road to life in Taliban ruled Afghanistan.

Thankfully this is not a film about how good the Americans are to wage war in Afghanistan, or is not about how evil the Taliban are for their support of Bin Laden and 9/11. This is the story of a young girl, and nothing more.

The acting is top-notch, and Marina Golbahari (Osama) performs completely realistically, making her the ray of light in this otherwise dark and depressing tale directed by Siddiq Barmak.

FINAL VERDICT: Watch it if you would like to watch a film about the effect of the Taliban regime in Afghanistan.

Avoid it completely if you do not want to be depressed. Though this film is not physically violent or gory, it is emotionally draining and distressing.

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